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Prescription , Rockledge Florida

Types of Prescription Drugs We Help You Get Treatment For:

Any pharmaceutical drug that legally requires medical prescription is considered a prescription drug. It is the opposite of over-the-counter drugs, which can be obtained without a doctor’s approval.

The reason some drugs are controlled is because of their addictive nature and the high risk of developing dependence in individuals who misuse them.

 

There are three classes of prescription drugs that are commonly misused: opioids, depressants, and stimulants. Opioids are used to treat pain; depressants can treat anxiety and sleep disorders; and stimulants can be used to boost energy and alertness in an individual.

 Branded Market Names

 Common market names for prescription drugs include Prilosec, Norvasc, Zocor, Prinivil, Zestril, Zithromax, and Synthroid.

 Street Names for Prescription Drugs

 -Apache

-China Girl

-Hydro

-Narco

-Smack

-Morpho

-Blue Heaven

 

History

 For more than a hundred years, prescription drugs have been abused all over the world. In the 1800s, laudanum, a mixture of alcohol and opium, was first used by doctors to treat pain, anxiety, coughing, diarrhea, and sleeplessness. However, its addictive properties quickly got people hooked.

 Laudanum was more frequently abused by women, because at that time men were abusing alcohol, and they did not allow women to visit bars. This caused more women to turn to laudanum, the drug that was often prescribed for problems with pregnancy, childbirth, and menstrual cramps.

 How Prescription Drugs are Abused

 Nowadays, prescription drugs are frequently abused by teenagers, as they believe it is safer than illegal street drugs. This misconception stems from the fact that the substances are prescribed by doctors, leading teens to think that misusing them would be less risky.

 This goes without saying that taking larger doses of a prescription drug, or taking it for longer than is recommended, is just as dangerous as abusing any other type of drug.

 Prescription drugs are often abused because of the high they produce. They give users a sense of euphoria, making them feel more confident and capable of socializing.

 Signs of Addiction

 -Inability to feel pain at normal levels

-Drowsiness

-Confusion

-Nausea

-Constipation

-Vomiting

-Chills

-Slurred speech

-Dilated pupils

 

Physical Effects

 The effects of prescription drug abuse will vary from person to person—no two cases are exactly the same. It will depend on the health condition, age, gender, body weight, rate of metabolism, drug taken, dosage taken, frequency of use, and whether they abuse another substance or not.

 

-Respiratory depression

-Respiratory arrest

-Hypotension

-Hypertension

-Coma

-Seizures

-Tremors

-Addiction

-Death

 

Mental and Psychological Effects of Prescription Drugs

 

-Impaired memory

-Cognitive problems

-Lack of coordination

-Aggressiveness

-Paranoia

-Hallucinations

-Self-harming behavior

-Contemplating suicide

 

Treatment for Prescription Drug Addiction

 Prescription drug addiction may be treated through medications. Find a treatment facility for the addicted individual or like prescription drug rehab, and they will undergo a medical assessment. Medical professionals will be able to come up with a treatment plan for the patient, based on their condition.

 They will likely undergo detoxification, during which they will be slowly taken off the drug. Their intake will gradually be lowered, while withdrawal symptoms are managed.

 Medications used for the treatment of prescription opioid addiction include methadone, naltrexone, and buprenorphine. These drugs can help fight cravings, allowing the patient to avoid relapsing.

 

Withdrawal Symptoms

 When a person who has developed dependence attempts to quit using the drug, withdrawal symptoms may occur. Just like the physical and mental effects of prescription drug abuse, these symptoms may vary from person to person.

 

-Tremors

-Loss of self-confidence

-Decreased sense of self-worth

-Excessive sweating

-Muscle pain

-Insomnia

-Depression

-Seizures

 

Rehabilitation

 Aside from detoxification and medications, the patient may also undergo behavioral treatments. This part of the rehabilitation process helps the person change their unhealthy choices. This allows them to get back to living a drug-free life. They will be taught various coping strategies, and be guided on what to do to avoid relapse.

 With proper counseling, the patient will be able to learn how to maintain their sober lifestyle. It can be done through group counseling sessions, family counseling, or even individually.

 They can rebuild their personal relationships and focus their energy on healthy, productive activities. In no time, they will be able to readjust to their life and role in society.

 Rehab Near Me Find Addiction Tretament Centers Rockledge Florida

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About Rockledge

Rockledge is the oldest city in Brevard County, Florida. The city's population was 27,678 at the 2020 Census, up from 24,926 at the 2010 United States Census, and is part of the Palm Bay−Melbourne−Titusville Metropolitan Statistical Area.

About Florida

Florida ( FLORR-ih-də) is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States. It borders the Gulf of Mexico to the west, Alabama to the northwest, Georgia to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the east; and the Straits of Florida and Cuba to the south. About two-thirds of Florida occupies a peninsula between the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. It has the longest coastline in the contiguous United States, spanning approximately 1,350 miles (2,170 km), not including its many barrier islands. It is the only state that borders both the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. With a population of over 21 million, it is the third-most populous state in the United States and ranks eighth in population density as of 2020. Florida spans 65,758 square miles (170,310 km2), ranking 22nd in area among the states. The Miami metropolitan area, anchored by the cities of Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and West Palm Beach, is the state's largest metropolitan area, with a population of 6.138 million; the most populous city is Jacksonville. Florida's other major population centers include Tampa Bay, Orlando, Cape Coral, and the state capital of Tallahassee. Various American Indian tribes have inhabited Florida for at least 14,000 years. In 1513, Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León became the first known European to make landfall, calling the region La Florida (land of flowers) ([la floˈɾiða]). Florida subsequently became the first area in the continental U.S. to be permanently settled by Europeans, with the settlement of St. Augustine, founded in 1565, being the oldest continuously inhabited city. Florida was a Spanish territory frequently attacked and coveted by Great Britain before Spain ceded it to the U.S. in 1819 in exchange for resolving the border dispute along the Sabine River in Spanish Texas. Florida was admitted as the 27th state on March 3, 1845, and was the principal location of the Seminole Wars (1816–1858), the longest and most extensive of the American Indian Wars. The state seceded from the Union on January 10, 1861, becoming one of the seven original Confederate States, and was readmitted to the Union after the Civil War on June 25, 1868. Since the mid-20th century, Florida has experienced rapid demographic and economic growth. Its economy, with a gross state product (GSP) of $1.4 trillion, is the fourth largest of any U.S. state and the 16th-largest in the world; the main sectors are tourism, hospitality, agriculture, real estate, and transportation. Florida is world-renowned for its beach resorts, amusement parks, warm and sunny climate, and nautical recreation; attractions such as Walt Disney World, the Kennedy Space Center, and Miami Beach draw tens of millions of visitors annually. Florida is a popular destination for retirees, seasonal vacationers, and both domestic and international migrants; it hosts nine out of the ten fastest-growing communities in the U.S. The state's close proximity to the ocean has shaped its culture, identity, and daily life; its colonial history and successive waves of migration are reflected in African, European, Indigenous, Latino, and Asian influences. Florida has attracted or inspired some of the most prominent American writers, including Ernest Hemingway, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, and Tennessee Williams, and continues to attract celebrities and athletes, especially in golf, tennis, auto racing, and water sports. Florida has been considered a battleground state in American presidential elections, particularly those in 2000 and 2016. Florida's climate varies from subtropical in the north to tropical in the south. It is the only state besides Hawaii to have a tropical climate, and the only continental state with both a tropical climate, located at the southern portion of the state, and a coral reef. Florida has several unique ecosystems, including Everglades National Park, the largest tropical wilderness in the U.S. and among the largest in the Americas. Unique wildlife include the American alligator, American crocodile, American flamingo, Roseate spoonbill, Florida panther, bottlenose dolphin, and manatee. The Florida Reef is the only living coral barrier reef in the continental United States, and the third-largest coral barrier reef system in the world, after the Great Barrier Reef and the Belize Barrier Reef.
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