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College Students Rehab, Drugs & Alcohol Pine Bluff Arkansas

COLLEGE STUDENTS
REHAB, DRUGS & ALCOHOL
In PINE BLUFF ARKANSAS

College is a difficult time for students
because it challenges them academically
as they prepare for the professional life.

ALCOHOL ADDICTION AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS

Binge drinking can interfere with all aspects of a personʼs life. Professionals have a hard time dealing with it—and college students suffer even more, because they have no idea how to manage their drinking habits.
Drinking at college is commonly glorified in pop culture, and this image certainly doesnʼt help the case against alcohol abuse. College students are more likely to think it is cool because of what they see on TV or at the movies.

The party culture is pervasive at many colleges and universities, not only because it helps students feel like they belong, it also reduces the stress and pressure that they are going through. Of course, excessive alcohol consumption doesnʼt actually make the body feel good. Itʼs not nearly as glorious as it is depicted on screen. However, trying to duplicate that experience in real life leads to a mentality that drinking means they are having fun

Alcohol Addiction among College Students Pine Bluff Arkansas
The Party Scene and Its Effects on the Youth Pine Bluff Arkansas

THE PARTY SCENE AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE YOUTH

College social life is more likely to involve alcohol, which in some cases may actually help a studentʼs social life. Drinking casually is something ingrained into culture and is actually celebrated. But excessive drinking is a different story. The party scene in college does not seem to make distinction.

Binge drinking in college may lead students to associate the experience with positive outcomes such as making new friends and feeling less anxious—even when casual drinking could make the same results in a much safer way.

There is also a reward-reinforcing effect caused by intoxication. This is what commonly leads to drinking problems and alcohol use disorder. Students typically benefit from a 30 day rehab program, or longer.

SIGNS OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN COLLEGE STUDENTS

Substance abuse is dangerous on so many levels. It affects a person physically, emotionally, mentally, socially, financially, and for some people, spiritually. If someone in the family is abusing drugs or drinking too much, it is important to look for the signs. This way, a solution can be made earlier—before the problem escalates.
It is important to note that the signs and symptoms of drug or alcohol abuse will vary based on the substance. Each person reacts to these things differently. This is why drug addiction treatment is heavily personalized.

Still, there are common psychological patterns that emerge that may be worth looking at, especially among those who are consistently abusing a substance. Personality changes are to be expected, and the student may become more secretive about their activities. Dramatic shifts in behavior may be hard to explain, but it could signal that something is wrong.A college student may be abusing a drug if they display a sudden, drastic change in grades or academic performance. They may have decreased interest in classes and extracurricular activities.

DRUG ABUSE, ALCOHOLISM, AND
ADDICTION: THE STATISTICS

The negative effects of excessive drinking are as serious as they are widespread. It not only affects college students, it affects the rest of the population, as there is currently an opioid crisis affecting the US. However, statistics involving college students are very important because they are most likely to abuse illicit substances as they enter adulthood. Dealing with these problems earlier can help prevent the opioid epidemic from worsening.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, more than 690,000 college students between the ages of 18 to 24 are assaulted by another student who has been drinking. 599,000 receive unintentional injuries while under the influence of alcohol.

About Arkansas

Arkansas ( (listen) AR-kən-saw) is a landlocked state in the South Central United States. It is bordered by Missouri to the north, Tennessee and Mississippi to the east, Louisiana to the south, and Texas and Oklahoma to the west. Its name is from the Osage language, a Dhegiha Siouan language, and referred to their relatives, the Quapaw people. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta. Arkansas is the 29th largest by area and the 34th most populous state, with a population of just over 3 million at the 2020 census. The capital and most populous city is Little Rock, in the central part of the state, a hub for transportation, business, culture, and government. The northwestern corner of the state, including the Fayetteville–Springdale–Rogers Metropolitan Area and Fort Smith metropolitan area, is a population, education, and economic center. The largest city in the state's eastern part is Jonesboro. The largest city in the state's southeastern part is Pine Bluff. Previously part of French Louisiana and the Louisiana Purchase, the Territory of Arkansas was admitted to the Union as the 25th state on June 15, 1836. Much of the Delta had been developed for cotton plantations, and landowners there largely depended on enslaved African Americans' labor. In 1861, Arkansas seceded from the United States and joined the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. On returning to the Union in 1868, Arkansas continued to suffer economically, due to its overreliance on the large-scale plantation economy. Cotton remained the leading commodity crop, and the cotton market declined. Because farmers and businessmen did not diversify and there was little industrial investment, the state fell behind in economic opportunity. In the late 19th century, the state instituted various Jim Crow laws to disenfranchise and segregate the African-American population. During the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, Arkansas and particularly Little Rock were major battlegrounds for efforts to integrate schools. White interests dominated Arkansas's politics, with disfranchisement of African Americans and refusal to reapportion the legislature. Only after the civil rights movement and federal legislation passed were more African Americans able to vote. The Supreme Court overturned rural domination in the South and other states that had refused to reapportion their state legislatures or retained rules based on geographic districts. In a series of cases in the 1960s during the height of related civil rights activities, the Warren Court invoked a one person, one vote principle, applying the Equal Protection Clause of the constitution and holding that states had to organize their legislatures by districts that held approximately equal populations, and that these had to be redefined as necessary after each decade's census. Following World War II in the 1940s, Arkansas began to diversify its economy and see prosperity. During the 1960s, the state became the base of the Walmart corporation, the world's largest company by revenue, headquartered in Bentonville. In the 21st century, Arkansas's economy is based on service industries, aircraft, poultry, steel, and tourism, along with important commodity crops of cotton, soybeans and rice. Arkansas's culture is observable in museums, theaters, novels, television shows, restaurants, and athletic venues across the state. Notable people from the state include politician and educational advocate William Fulbright; former president Bill Clinton, who also served as the 40th and 42nd governor of Arkansas; general Wesley Clark, former NATO Supreme Allied Commander; Walmart founder and magnate Sam Walton; singer-songwriters Johnny Cash, Charlie Rich, Jimmy Driftwood, and Glen Campbell; actor-filmmaker Billy Bob Thornton; poet C. D. Wright; physicist William L. McMillan, a pioneer in superconductor research; poet laureate Maya Angelou; Douglas MacArthur; musician Al Green; actor Alan Ladd; basketball player Scottie Pippen; singer Ne-Yo; Chelsea Clinton; actress Sheryl Underwood; and author John Grisham.

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