IMAGINE YOURSELF FREE FROM ADDICTION!
Who Answers?
College Students Rehab, Drugs & Alcohol Birmingham Alabama

COLLEGE STUDENTS
REHAB, DRUGS & ALCOHOL
In BIRMINGHAM ALABAMA

College is a difficult time for students
because it challenges them academically
as they prepare for the professional life.

ALCOHOL ADDICTION AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS

Binge drinking can interfere with all aspects of a personʼs life. Professionals have a hard time dealing with it—and college students suffer even more, because they have no idea how to manage their drinking habits.
Drinking at college is commonly glorified in pop culture, and this image certainly doesnʼt help the case against alcohol abuse. College students are more likely to think it is cool because of what they see on TV or at the movies.

The party culture is pervasive at many colleges and universities, not only because it helps students feel like they belong, it also reduces the stress and pressure that they are going through. Of course, excessive alcohol consumption doesnʼt actually make the body feel good. Itʼs not nearly as glorious as it is depicted on screen. However, trying to duplicate that experience in real life leads to a mentality that drinking means they are having fun

Alcohol Addiction among College Students Birmingham Alabama
The Party Scene and Its Effects on the Youth Birmingham Alabama

THE PARTY SCENE AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE YOUTH

College social life is more likely to involve alcohol, which in some cases may actually help a studentʼs social life. Drinking casually is something ingrained into culture and is actually celebrated. But excessive drinking is a different story. The party scene in college does not seem to make distinction.

Binge drinking in college may lead students to associate the experience with positive outcomes such as making new friends and feeling less anxious—even when casual drinking could make the same results in a much safer way.

There is also a reward-reinforcing effect caused by intoxication. This is what commonly leads to drinking problems and alcohol use disorder. Students typically benefit from a 30 day rehab program, or longer.

SIGNS OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN COLLEGE STUDENTS

Substance abuse is dangerous on so many levels. It affects a person physically, emotionally, mentally, socially, financially, and for some people, spiritually. If someone in the family is abusing drugs or drinking too much, it is important to look for the signs. This way, a solution can be made earlier—before the problem escalates.
It is important to note that the signs and symptoms of drug or alcohol abuse will vary based on the substance. Each person reacts to these things differently. This is why drug addiction treatment or teen rehab is heavily personalized.

Still, there are common psychological patterns that emerge that may be worth looking at, especially among those who are consistently abusing a substance. Personality changes are to be expected, and the student may become more secretive about their activities. Dramatic shifts in behavior may be hard to explain, but it could signal that something is wrong.A college student may be abusing a drug if they display a sudden, drastic change in grades or academic performance. They may have decreased interest in classes and extracurricular activities.

DRUG ABUSE, ALCOHOLISM, AND
ADDICTION: THE STATISTICS

The negative effects of excessive drinking are as serious as they are widespread. It not only affects college students, it affects the rest of the population, as there is currently an opioid crisis affecting the US. However, statistics involving college students are very important because they are most likely to abuse illicit substances as they enter adulthood. Dealing with these problems earlier can help prevent the opioid epidemic from worsening.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, more than 690,000 college students between the ages of 18 to 24 are assaulted by another student who has been drinking. 599,000 receive unintentional injuries while under the influence of alcohol.

About Birmingham

Birmingham ( BUR-ming-ham) is a city in the north central region of Alabama. Birmingham is the county seat of Jefferson County, Alabama's most populous county. As of the 2022 census estimates, Birmingham had a population of 196,910, down 2% from the 2020 census, making it Alabama's third-most populous city after Huntsville and Montgomery. The broader Birmingham metropolitan area had a 2020 population of 1,115,289, and is the largest metropolitan area in Alabama as well as the 50th-most populous in the United States. Birmingham serves as an important regional hub and is associated with the Deep South, Piedmont, and Appalachian regions of the nation. Birmingham was founded in 1871, during the post–Civil War Reconstruction period, through the merger of three pre-existing farm towns, notably, Elyton. It grew from there, annexing many more of its smaller neighbors, into an industrial and railroad transportation center with a focus on mining, the iron and steel industry, and railroading. Birmingham was named after Birmingham, England, one of the UK's major industrial cities. Most of the original settlers who founded Birmingham were of English ancestry. The city may have been planned as a place where cheap, non-unionized, and often African-American labor from rural Alabama could be employed in the city's steel mills and blast furnaces, giving it a competitive advantage over industrial cities in the Midwest and Northeast. From its founding through the end of the 1960s, Birmingham was a primary industrial center of the South. The pace of Birmingham's growth during the period from 1881 through 1920 earned its nicknames The Magic City and The Pittsburgh of the South. Much like Pittsburgh, Birmingham's major industries were iron and steel production, plus a major component of the railroading industry, where rails and railroad cars were both manufactured in Birmingham. In the field of railroading, the two primary hubs of railroading in the Deep South were nearby Atlanta and Birmingham, beginning in the 1860s and continuing through to the present day. The economy diversified during the later half of the twentieth century. Though the manufacturing industry maintains a strong presence in Birmingham, other businesses and industries such as banking, telecommunications, transportation, electrical power transmission, medical care, college education, and insurance have risen in stature. Mining in the Birmingham area is no longer a major industry with the exception of coal mining. Birmingham ranks as one of the most important business centers in the Southeastern United States and is also one of the largest banking centers in the United States. In addition, the Birmingham area serves as headquarters to two Fortune 500 companies: Regions Financial and Vulcan Materials Company, along with multiple other Fortune 1000 companies. In higher education, Birmingham has been the location of the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine (formerly the Medical College of Alabama) and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry since 1947. In 1969 the University of Alabama at Birmingham was established, one of three main campuses of the University of Alabama System. Birmingham is also home to three private institutions: Samford University, Birmingham-Southern College, and Miles College. Between these colleges and universities, the Birmingham area has major colleges of medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, law, engineering, and nursing. Birmingham is also the headquarters of the Southeastern Conference, one of the major U.S. collegiate athletic conferences.

About Alabama

Alabama ( AL-ə-BAM-ə) is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States. It borders Tennessee to the north, Georgia to the east, Florida and the Gulf of Mexico to the south, and Mississippi to the west. Alabama is the 30th largest by area and the 24th-most populous of the 50 U.S. states. Alabama is nicknamed the Yellowhammer State, after the state bird. Alabama is also known as the "Heart of Dixie" and the "Cotton State". The state has diverse geography, with the north dominated by the mountainous Tennessee Valley and the south by Mobile Bay, a historically significant port. Alabama's capital is Montgomery, and its largest city by population and area is Huntsville. Its oldest city is Mobile, founded by French colonists (Alabama Creoles) in 1702 as the capital of French Louisiana. Greater Birmingham is Alabama's largest metropolitan area and its economic center. Politically, as part of the Deep South, Alabama is predominantly a conservative state, and is known for its Southern culture. Within Alabama, American football, particularly at the college level, plays a major part of the state's culture. Originally home to many native tribes, present-day Alabama was a Spanish territory beginning in the sixteenth century until the French acquired it in the early eighteenth century. The British won the territory in 1763 until losing it in the American Revolutionary War. Spain held Mobile as part of Spanish West Florida until 1813. In December 1819, Alabama was recognized as a state. During the antebellum period, Alabama was a major producer of cotton, and widely used African American slave labor. In 1861, the state seceded from the United States to become part of the Confederate States of America, with Montgomery acting as its first capital, and rejoined the Union in 1868. Following the American Civil War, Alabama would suffer decades of economic hardship, in part due to agriculture and a few cash crops being the main driver of the state's economy. Similar to other former slave states, Alabamian legislators employed Jim Crow laws from the late 19th century up until the 1960s. High-profile events such as the Selma to Montgomery march made the state a major focal point of the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. During and after World War II, Alabama grew as the state's economy diversified with new industries. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville would help Alabama's economic growth in the mid-to-late 20th century, by developing an aerospace industry. Alabama's economy in the 21st century is based on automotive, finance, tourism, manufacturing, aerospace, mineral extraction, healthcare, education, retail, and technology.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Serving All Of the US

GIVE US A CALL
tel : +855 339 1112

Addiction Treatment Centers For
Drugs, Alcohol and Prescription Drug Abuse

Call Now
×
life-style